Information

L'Après-midi d'un faune / Les Biches / Shéhérazade

Choreography Bronislawa Nijinska / Vaslav Nijinsky / Mikhail Fokine · Composer Francis Poulenc / Claude Debussy / Nikolai Rimski Korsakow

Saturday, 27. September 2014
07:30 pm – 09:45 pm
Köln

Oper am Dom (Musical Dome)

Duration est. 2 hours 15 minutes · Les Biches (est. 07:30 pm - 08:05 pm ) · Interval (est. 08:05 pm - 08:10 pm ) · L'Après-midi d'un faune (est. 08:10 pm - 08:20 pm ) · Interval (est. 08:20 pm - 08:50 pm ) · Shéhérazade (est. 08:50 pm - 09:35 pm )

To List of Performances

Cast

Les Biches

Choreographie
Bronislawa Nijinska
Musik
Francis Poulenc
Bühne und Kostüme
Marie Laurencin
Licht
Christian Kass

L'Après-midi d'un faune

Choreographie
Vaslav Nijinsky
Musik
Claude Debussy
Bühne und Kostüm
Léon Bakst
Licht
Christian Kass

Shéhérazade

Choreographie
Mikhail Fokine
Choreographische Rekonstruktion
Isabelle Fokine
Musik
Nikolai Rimski-Korsakow
Bühne und Kostüme nach den Original-Entwürfen von
Léon Bakst
Licht
Christian Kass
Realisierung Bühnenbild
Ulrich Franz
Realisierung Kostüme
Astrid Eisenberger

  • Soloists and corps de ballet of the Bavarian State Ballet
To List of Performances

Learn more

Originating from Paris in 1909, the dance avant garde conquered the world in the form of the Ballets Russes. The "Dance Country Germany" welcomed them with open arms. In 1912 already, Vaslav Nijinsky, famous dancer and choreographer of the group, danced at Munich’s Nationaltheater. The stylistic variety, the mysterious mixture of the present and a rather opulent exotic appeal remain effective to this day. The Bavarian State Ballet stayed true to its thorough and authentic approach to reconstructing the almost completely lost world of rich imagery in Shéhérazade. "A tragic episode of love and death; light humor of the 20s in the realm of the Côte d’Azur. Cheeky teenagers, Les biches in French, tease their male counterparts. Then there is the Afternoon of a Faun, which caused a major outcry amongst audiences back in 1912 due to it overtly sexual content."
Claudia Jeschke and Ann Hutchinson-Guest revived the fragile miniature with the help of the Nijinsky’s sketches and notes and a great eye for detail. Neither vulgarity nor hastiness can lessen the overall appeal of the subtle movement language with all its nuances.

 

To List of Performances

Biographies

Diaghilew, who made her famous, never could quite stomach the fact that she was the sister of his dear friend, a friend who left him without remorse. Strawinsky, who considered her to be the most successful choreographer of the Diaghilew-era when it came to the staging of his own works, described the awkward relationship between Diaghilew and Nijinska to Robert Craft thus: "Poor Bronislawa never did have any luck with Diaghilew. Because she had a bony and interesting face rather than that of a doll, Diaghilew never cast her for Petruchka. This had nothing to do with her level of technical proficiency, since the Nijinskis, brother and sister alike, were the most skilled dance couple one could possibly imagine. Nijinsky's marriage only exacerbated Diaghilew's prejudices against her; she looked like Nijinsky, she even had the same physical build with the same broad shoulders. She constantly reminded him of her brother, and it pained him to see that this person who dared resemble Nijinsky was a woman… In a way, her sex, her outward appearance and her name turned him against her. I always regretted this circumstance because apart from her and Fokine, most choreographers of my ballets were more concerned with executing rather than inventing steps."

Diaghilew's prejudice never did, however, stop her from contributing productions to the repertoire of the Ballets Russes which today are considered milestones in the development of the art-form. Born in 1891 in Minsk – a year after her brother Vaslav – Nijinska was raised in St. Petersburg where she attended the Imperial Ballet Academy and studied with Enrico Cecchetti. After graduating in 1908 she became a member of the Mariinski-Ballet, only to join Diaghilew's company in his first Paris-season of 1909. After the falling-out between Diaghilew and Nijinsky in 1913, in which unpleasant situation she sided with her brother, all parties concerned went separate ways. Bronislawa Fominischna, lovingly called Bronja by her colleagues throughout her lifetime, moved to Kiew during World War I where she danced at the opera, opened her own dance school and began choreographing.

Her second professional affiliation with Diaghilew began in 1921 with the splendid Sleeping Beauty production in London, in which she was involved as a dancer, director and choreographer. In the following years she created ballets which established her as a leading choreographer of the time: Strawinsky's Renard (1922) and Les Noces (1923), Poulenc's Les Biches, Auric'’s Les Fâcheux and Milhaud's Le Train bleu (all in 1925). Two of these ballets are considered no less than key choreographic works of the last century: Les Noces’und Les Biches. Little wonder, then, that she was the first women in Diaghilew's company to achieve international acclaim.

Throughout the following years Nijinska acted as choreographer for the latter's company, creating ballets which should cement her fame. Afterwards, she even expanded her activities by working with Ida Rubinstein's company in 1928/29 on Strawinsky's Le Baiser de la Fée as well as on Ravel's Bolero and La Valse. After working at the Opéra Russe à Paris, the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, with Max Reinhardt in Berlin as well as founding her own company in 1932, Nijinska moved to California in 1938 where she opened a dance school. She also continued to accept offers for guest appearances from South America, the ABT, the Grand Ballett du Marquis de Cuevas and the Royal Ballet in London. She died on 12. Februar 1972 in Pacific Palisades, just after having completed the manuscript for her book 'My Brother, Vaslav Nijinsky'. It is no coincidence that she created her most significant ballets for Diaghilew: She was in need of, how shall we put it, an authoritarian figure to push her to her limits. In this she was like other Diaghilew-colleagues who, after the impresario's death, restlessly switched companies and only seldom reached the artistic heights of their former work – even Balanchine seemed to suffer the same fate before he met Kirstein in 1933 who invited him to work in the US, thereby establishing what would become the American ballet of today. This explains why she was overjoyed to have been invited by Frederick Ashton to restage her two most important creations with the Royal Ballet in the mid-60s. The renowned British company has ever since cherished Nijinska's Les Biches and Les Noces, and are aware of their historical responsibility in preserving these productions for future generations to enjoy.

To List of Performances

Shop

To List of Performances